Right to Sustainable Livelihood and Social Protection

*This is an excerpt from PKKK’s Rural Women Status Report on CEDAW 2011.


ILO defines social protection as a set of policies and programs such as labor market programs, social insurance, social equity, child protection and social assistance and welfare.[1] To many rural women organizations in PKKK in may be in the form of “damayan, paluwagan or aniban” or self help informal social protection schemes.[2]  In the last two years PKKK advocated for social services, support services and jobs instead of conditional cash transfer that the former and the new government promote.  [3]Further PKKK posits that social protection should be universal and not voluntary.

Three Focus Group Discussions among rural and indigenous women was conducted in Aurora and Nueva Ecija[4]. Household farm production is very low due to the small size of their farms.   The research reported that rural and indigenous household has diversified income sources to adapt to their situation.   Microfinance services such as ASKI, Joyful Business, MADECO and Producer are present.  Some members access Philhealth, SSS, SEA K and others.  Also, the economic and social services from the government are limited.

Limited access to land, high cost of farm inputs and low production endangers the food security in the household.  Because of changing food preference of young members of the household there is an increase expenditure on food.  Before they would eat rootcrops but now they prefer rice and processed food.

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Representation and Participation of Rural Women in Governance and Implementation of Gender and Development

*This is an excerpt from PKKK’s Rural Women Status Report on CEDAW 2011.


The Magna Carta of Women is framed in the context of CEDAW. It defines Gender and Development (GAD) as development perspective and process that are participatory and empowering, equitable, sustainable, free from violence, respectful of human rights, supportive of self determination and actualization of human potentials. It seeks to achieve gender equality as a fundamental value that should be reflected in development choices; seeks to transform society’s social, economic, and political structures and questions the validity of gender roles they ascribed to women and men; contends that women are active agents of development and not just passive recipients of development assistance; and stresses the need of women to organize themselves and participate in political processes to strengthen their legal rights.

There are several laws pro-actively promoting and protecting the rights of women. And yet, women’s important role and contribution in development and nation building are not yet fully recognized. Rural women are often treated at the sidelines. Their representation and participation in different local development councils and special bodies has been dismal. PKKK  cited several factors contributing to gender inequality in governance and participation: (1) the traditional notion that women’s role is always in the house, still proliferates in rural communities; (2) women commonly exhibit low confidence and self-esteem because the society considered them inferior in terms of decision-making, or being discouraged and prevented by their husbands or fathers from joining organizations or any political undertaking; (3) lack of information on CEDAW, law on gender equality, programs, resources and services not only of rural women but also local government officials and policy implementers; (4) men still dominate in the elective positions and leadership structure; (5) women’s participation in local elections are often impeded by traditional politics and  non-accreditation due to inconsistent processes/guidelines rigid requirements.

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Rights of Women Fishers

*This is an excerpt from PKKK’s Rural Women Status Report on CEDAW 2011.


Magna Carta of Women or RA 9710 defines fisherfolk (women) as “those directly or indirectly engaged in taking, culturing, or processing fishery or aquatic resources. These include, but are not to be limited to, women engaged in fishing in municipal waters, costal and marine areas, women workers in commercial fishing and aquaculture, vendors and processors of fish and coastal products, and subsistence producers such as shell-gatherers, managers and producers of mangrove resources, and other related producers.”

The Magna Carta of Women is an important legislative milestone for women in the fisheries sector because it clearly defines and recognizes their marginalization in resource management and governance as a result of gender-based discrimination.  It also addresses and rectifies the common notion of fishing as a work of “men” that resulted in the continuing marginalization of women fishers.

Furthermore, women fishers are guaranteed specific rights and entitlements such as equal rights to utilize, manage, develop and benefit from fisheries and aquatic resources, equal opportunities for empowerment and participation in resource management, governance and other relevant economic activities.

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